Tomás Ó Flatharta

Looking at Things from the Left

Archive for the ‘“Vpered” (“Forward”), Russian section of the Fourth International’ Category

For a democratic and socialist Kazakhstan! Stop the intervention, release the detainees!

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An interesting statement signed by a number of Russian fighting-left organizations is below. Source : https://internationalviewpoint.org/spip.php?article7477. See also https://tomasoflatharta.com/2022/01/15/public-meeting-solidarity-with-the-kazakhstan-uprising/. And for more information, read this blog https://kazakhsolidarity.wordpress.com/

For a democratic and socialist Kazakhstan! Stop the intervention, release the detainees!

Mass Protest in Kazakhstan

Mass protests have been going on in Kazakhstan for several days. The detonator of the uprising was the rise in prices for liquefied gas, but it is obvious that the contradictions, which eventually led to a social explosion, accumulated in Kazakhstan for years.

At the moment, the protesters are forming their own self-governing bodies, in some cities administrative buildings and offices of law enforcement agencies have been taken by storm.

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Solidarity with the uprising in Kazakhstan

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Solidarity with the uprising in Kazakhstan

This is an excellent initiative. Organizations and individuals from many parts of the globe – including five members of the Dáil in Dublin and elected representatives from Belfast and Derry, along with trade unionists, socialists, feminists and left public representatives” in other countries. Hopefully more people and organizations will endorse this statement, and stimulate the building of a mass movement in solidarity with the people of Kazakhstan.

There has been a rapid and strong response to the circulation of this Kazakhstan solidarity statement. Very close to 200 signatures in almost 40 countries were collected in the space of just two days, with many prominent individuals and organisations.

For more information read this blog https://kazakhsolidarity.wordpress.com/

Statement issued 12 January 2022.

Sources :

https://www.letusrise.ie/featured-articles/solidarity-with-the-uprising-in-kazakhstan?fbclid=IwAR0k46VWYR__tRoWW0wPUYbW29WSMJFe7h08ya3UrA8Bz44k_FEccsFboro

Solidarity with the uprising in Kazakhstan

http://www.europe-solidaire.org/spip.php?article60687

We, socialists, trade unionists, human rights activists, anti-war activists and organisations have watched the uprising in Kazakhstan since 2 January with a sense of deep solidarity for the working people. The striking oil workers, miners and protesters have faced incredible repression. The full force of the police and army have been unleashed against them, instructed to ‘shoot to kill without warning’. Over 160 protesters have been killed so far and more than 8,000 have been arrested.

We reject the propaganda of the dictatorship that this uprising is a product of “Islamic radicals” or the intervention of US imperialism. There is no evidence of that whatsoever. It is the usual resort of an unpopular regime – to blame ‘outside’ agitators.

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How the Russian Left Survived in a Post‑Soviet World. : Ilya Budraitskis, Translation : Giuliano Vivaldi

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This fascinating history of the fighting left in Russia since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 is recommended to readers of this blog.

The author, Ilya Budraitskis, is a leader of the “Vpered” (“Forward”), Russian section of the Fourth International, which participated in the founding of the Russian Socialist Movement (RSD) in 2011. This article was spotted on this blog : https://anticapitalistresistance.org/how-the-russian-left-survived-in-a-post-soviet-world/

This article originally appeared on the global dialogue website and can be located here.

Long Read

After the demise of the USSR on December 26, 1991, the Russian left had to find its place in a society transformed beyond recognition. In the face of huge challenges, its activists have led important struggles against the system established by Yeltsin and Putin.

The story of the modern left movement in Russia begins in the late 1980s, during the era of perestroika. From the very beginning it carried a contradictory combination of two political tendencies of the late Soviet period: popular (anti-market, statist) Stalinism and democratic socialism; nostalgic idealization of the USSR and criticism of it from the left. These political tendencies entered the public political arena in the late 1980s, and immediately found themselves on opposite sides of the battlefield dividing supporters and opponents of Mikhail Gorbachev’s perestroika.

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